Wednesday, October 14, 2009

The Five Pillars of Islam

As we have also seen, Muslims believe that Muhammad was the last of a series of prophets that God sent to earth. While respecting the teachings of all earlier prophets, Muslims believe that Allah sent his final message to Muhammad in order to correct the corruption of the previous messages. As with the other Abrahamic religions, Satan also exists in Islamic theology, but Islam's strict monotheism maintains that God is the most important figure. Satan is not nearly as important in Islam as he is in Christianity, for example. Also unlike Christianity, Muslims do not believe in original sin. They believe that God pardoned Adam's sin in order for human beings to begin life without sin. Muslims who have sinned in their lives, and who sincerely repent and submit to God, can be forgiven for their sins. Muslims also believe in a Judgement Day, when the world will end and the dead will rise to be judged.

There are Five Pillars of Islam, which are the most important practices for a Muslim to observe:


  1. Creed (Shahada): The statement of Shahada in Arabic is: "Ashhadu al-la ilaha illa-llah wa ashhadu anna Muhammadar rasulu-llah." An English translation would be: "I bear witness that there is no God but Allah and I bear witness that Muhammad is His Messenger." This declaration of the faith must be uttered publicly at least once in a Muslim's lifetime, although most Muslims recite it daily. 
  2.  Prayers (Salate): The Muslim holy day is Friday, when congregations gather just past noon in a masjid, or mosque in English, the Muslim place of worship. The three holiest places of worship in the Islamic world are the Mosque of the Ka'ba in Mecca, the Mosque of the Prophet Muhammad in Medina, and the Masjid Aqsa, adjacent to the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem. An Imam, or religious leader, gives a sermon and leads the congregation in prayer. Muslims do not need to be in a mosque in order to pray, however; they may do it anywhere - a house, office, school, or even outside. They must observe the qibla in all cases though, by facing towards the Ka'ba in Mecca when praying. Prayers must be performed five times daily - at dawn, noon, mid-afternoon, sunset, and nightfall. The prayers always contain verses from the Qur'an, and must be said in Arabic. Muslims believe that prayer provides a direct link between the worshipper and God.
  3.  Purifying Tax (Zakat): Muslims believe that all things belong to God, and that humans hold wealth in trust for him. For that reason, it is believed that wealth should be distributed throughout the community of believers, or umma, through a purifying tax. The usual payment is 2.5 per cent of a person's wealth every year, the proceeds of which are distributed to the less fortunate. Additional charity work is also encouraged. 
  4.  Fasting (Saum): During the month of Ramadan, the ninth month in the Islamic calendar, Muslims fast between dawn and dusk. They must abstain from food, liquid, and intimate contact during those hours of the day, in order to commemorate the Muslim belief that Ramadan was the month in which the Qur'an descended from the highest heaven to the lowest, from which it was then revealed to Muhammad in pieces over 22 years. Fasting is seen as a method of self-purification, by cutting oneself off from worldly comforts. The sick, elderly, travellers, and nursing or pregnant women are permitted to break the fast during Ramadan, provided they make up for it during an equal number of days later in the year. Children begin the ritual at puberty. The end of Ramadan is celebrated by the Eid al-Fitr, one of the major festivals on the Muslim calendar. 
  5. Pilgrimage (Hajj): All Muslims are required to make one pilgrimage to Mecca in their lifetimes, provided they are physically and financially able to do so. The Hajj begins in the 12th month of the Islamic lunar calendar which means, like Ramadan, it does not correspond to a specific month in the solar calendar. Modern transportation methods, particularly the airplane, have made it possible for many more Muslims to make the Hajj today than 1400 years ago. Like Ramadan, the end of the Hajj is also celebrated with a festival, the Eid al-Adha, which is celebrated by all Muslims, whether or not they made the pilgrimage. These two festivals are the highlight of the Islamic year. 

Air Gear

Loading... media
[ Air Gear 1 ] [ Air Gear 2 ] [ Air Gear 3 ] [ Air Gear 4 ] [ Air Gear 5 ] [ Air Gear 6 ] [ Air Gear 7 ] [ Air Gear 8 ] [ Air Gear 9 ] [ Air Gear 10 ] [ Air Gear 11 ] [ Air Gear 12 ] [ Air Gear 13 ] [ Air Gear 14 ] [ Air Gear 15 ] [ Air Gear 16 ] [ Air Gear 17 ] [ Air Gear 18 ] [ Air Gear 19 ] [ Air Gear 20 ] [ Air Gear 21 ] [ Air Gear 22 ] [ Air Gear 23 ] [ Air Gear 24 ] [ Air Gear 25 ] [ Air Gear 26 ] [ Air Gear 27 ] [ Air Gear 28 ] [ Air Gear 29 ] [ Air Gear 30 ] [ Air Gear 31 ] [ Air Gear 32 ] [ Air Gear 33 ] [ Air Gear 34 ] [ Air Gear 35 ] [ Air Gear 36 ] [ Air Gear 37 ] [ Air Gear 38 ] [ Air Gear 39 ] [ Air Gear 40 ] [ Air Gear 41 ] [ Air Gear 42 ] [ Air Gear 43 ] [ Air Gear 44 ] [ Air Gear 45 ] [ Air Gear 46 ] [ Air Gear 47 ] [ Air Gear 48 ] [ Air Gear 49 ] [ Air Gear 50 ] [ Air Gear 51 ] [ Air Gear 52 ] [ Air Gear 53 ] [ Air Gear 54 ] [ Air Gear 55 ] [ Air Gear 56 ] [ Air Gear 57 ] [ Air Gear 58 ] [ Air Gear 59 ] [ Air Gear 60 ] [ Air Gear 61 ] [ Air Gear 62 ] [ Air Gear 63 ] [ Air Gear 64 ] [ Air Gear 65 ] [ Air Gear 66 ] [ Air Gear 67 ] [ Air Gear 68 ] [ Air Gear 69 ] [ Air Gear 70 ] [ Air Gear 71 ] [ Air Gear 72 ] [ Air Gear 73 ] [ Air Gear 74 ] [ Air Gear 75 ] [ Air Gear 76 ] [ Air Gear 77 ] [ Air Gear 78 ] [ Air Gear 79 ] [ Air Gear 80 ] [ Air Gear 81 ] [ Air Gear 82 ] [ Air Gear 83 ] [ Air Gear 84 ] [ Air Gear 85 ] [ Air Gear 86 ] [ Air Gear 87 ] [ Air Gear 88 ] [ Air Gear 89 ] [ Air Gear 90 ] [ Air Gear 91 ] [ Air Gear 92 ] [ Air Gear 93 ] [ Air Gear 94 ] [ Air Gear 95 ] [ Air Gear 96 ] [ Air Gear 97 ] [ Air Gear 98 ] [ Air Gear 99 ] [ Air Gear 100 ]

One Piece (Latest!!!)

Naruto (Latest!!!)